Projects for the new Rome and Floyd County SPLOST are starting to come together.  Projects were proposed by Rome Water and Sewer Director Mike Hackett during a meeting with city offials this week that included such things as water and levee improvements.

Some of the items that are being discussed for this November’s ballot:

*Replacing water lines in the Rosemont Park area, as well as extending a water main on Maple Street.

*Improvements to the Bruce Hamler Water Treatment facility.

*New roofs for the wastewater treatment plant

*Armuchee sewer improvements serving areas of Old Summerville and Old Dalton Raods.

Better fire protection for Bekaert and Rosemont Park, a sewer fix in Armu­chee and whatever the levee system around South Rome may need are among the improvements that could be funded through an extension of the 1-cent special purpose, local option sales tax.

 

The ELOST will also be on this November’s ballot and will come with much controversy.

The main proposal includes the creation and building of a “college and career academy” for Rome High School.   The building, which will also feature an indoor practice facility for Rome High School sports, would be built on the school’s campus, rather than joining with the academy Floyd County already has in place.

Many against the proposal said that it would be extremely difficult to set up work experience programs in the area for two different systems.  One anonymous source said that it is simply a diversion tactic so that the system can build an indoor practice facility for the football program.

Those that are in support of the new building said that it would help ease space constraints that are coming due to the increase in student population.

Other possible projects include:

*consolidating Main and North Heights Elementary School

*Turning the current North Heights School into a STEM academy for all of the city’s sixth grade students.

* Installing air conditioning in all of the elementary school gyms

*putting cameras in all schools

*updating and replacing Chromebooks